22 April 2009

Barbara Kacicek


In her blog, simply entitled “Barbara Kacicek/Recent Paintings”, Barbara Kacicek posts wonderful still lifes, landscapes, skyscapes, and humanscapes. The still lifes are well crafted realist paintings, many standing out due to the artist’s selection of subject and palette. A few of her still life subjects are somewhat uncommon. Instead of picking normal pears, she picked red bartletts with green stripes. Her anthropomorphic abate fetel pears look as if they are thinking about their next move. As many a still life artist will attest, this type of venturing off the straight and narrow with a commonly known subject increases the realist painting challenge. A viewer will accept these variances in a photograph, but they are more skeptical of them in a painting. Ms. Kacicek bests the challenge handily – I am still waiting for those pears to tell me what they’re up to. Even without the subject matter variances, her decisions as to light, form, and color are unique. Those appear to be relatively straight forward plums, but she chose to place them on a purple ground, an unexpected choice and she pulled it off beautifully. Some of the landscapes, skyscapes, and humanscapes border on the abstract with their compositions usually simple and very well thought out. The humanscapes can be deceiving due to the closeness of the subject and the artist’s choice of what part of the body to reveal. Please go view more of her work at: www.barbarakacicek.blogspot.com. Ms. Kacicek has multiple blogs and there are clear links to them in the blog’s sidebar. Barbara Kacicek’s daughter, Oriana is also an accomplished artist. While it might seem like a “neato” idea to review the mother and daughter together, I do not feel their familial relationship defines them as artists. If their work was collaborative, that would be a different story, but it’s not. Oriana Kacicek’s art stands on its own and I encourage you to go and see her work at www.orianakacicek.blogspot.com. I think you’ll see her talent warrants a review of its own, so don’t be surprised when you see it.